The UCI strengthens anti-doping programme for UCI Women’s WorldTeams

Jan 23, 2020, 15:00 PM

As part of the introduction of the eight UCI Women’s WorldTeams – the equivalent to the premier division of the UCI Women’s WorldTour and a key aspect of the reorganisation of women’s professional road cycling in 2020 – the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) has decided as of this season to make more resources available through the anti-doping programme set up for this new team category.

Developed and implemented by the Cycling Anti-Doping Foundation (CADF), the programme will see teams and the UCI step up their financial commitment:

  • UCI Women’s WorldTeams: EUR 10,000 per team;
  • UCI: EUR 10,000 per UCI Women’s WorldTeam.

As a result, each UCI Women’s WorldTeam will be provided with an overall budget of EUR 20,000. This significant growth in financial resources should lead to a sizeable increase in the number of riders included in the UCI Registered Testing Pool (RTP).

In 2020, the total number of women road riders in the RTP will rise to 53, on the basis of a minimum of three athletes per registered UCI Women’s WorldTeam, as opposed to 29 last year and 90 tests being taken (in line with the most recent figures).

Riders in the RTP provide whereabouts information that allows random tests to be carried out, a key feature of the anti-doping programme. These tests can be combined with those conducted by the National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs).

Beyond 2020, the number of athletes in the RTP will continue to grow as a result of the increase in the number of UCI Women’s WorldTeams registered for the competition:

  • 12 UCI Women’s WorldTeams in 2021, leading to a minimum of 65 riders in the RTP;
  • 15 UCI Women’s WorldTeams in 2022, leading to a minimum of 74 riders in the RTP. 

Growth in the number of women road riders in the RTP (2019-2022):

 Minimum number of riders in the RTPChange (%) on 2019
201929 
202053+82
202165+124
202274+155

Further measures consolidating the programme for UCI Women’s WorldTeams include the following:

  • Tests conducted throughout the UCI Women’s WorldTour (21 events in ten countries, amounting to 46 days of racing);
  • Blood tests conducted before and during competitions for the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP);
  • Tests carried out at training camps;
  • Long-term storage of samples taken.

From an operational viewpoint, and with a view to ensuring these additional measures are effectively implemented, the CADF will continue to pursue its strategy of coordinating and pooling resources with the NADOs.

“The significant increase in resources for supporting the UCI Women’s WorldTeams, the newly created premier division of women’s professional road cycling, is an important new phase in the UCI’s commitment to clean sport and the stance our Federation is taking in leading the fight against drug cheats,” said UCI President David Lappartient. “Safeguarding cycling’s integrity and reputation has a cost but not a price.”